May 22, 2022, 19:13

    Prince Charles steps in for Queen and is joined by William at State Opening of Parliament

    Prince Charles steps in for Queen and is joined by William at State Opening of Parliament

    Prince Charles and his son Prince William took the place of the Queen by attending the State Opening of Parliament today in her place.

    The royal pair were at the opening Parliament on the Queen’s behalf in a historic, unprecedented move, which also saw Charles read the Queen’s Speech and said the Government’s priority is to “strengthen the economy and help ease the cost of living".

    Last night the monarch, 96, reluctantly pulled out of the major ceremonial occasion – nearly 60 years after she last missed it – following advice from her royal doctors as she continues to experience “episodic mobility problems”.

    It is the first time that Charles, 73, takes on the head of state’s major constitutional duty and the move will be interpreted as a symbolic and significant shift in his responsibilities as a future monarch.

    Prince Charles, Camilla and Prince William at the State Opening of Parliament today
    (

    Image:
    POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

    The Imperial State Crown is place in front of the empty throne
    (

    Image:
    Sky News)

    It is also William’s first state opening – and the royal function of opening a new parliament has been delegated to both Charles and William by the Queen. For the occasion, William wore a morning suit while Charles wore a naval uniform.

    The Duchess of Cornwall, a future Queen Consort, also accompanied Charles, and wore a beautiful navy coat dress and matching hat.

    Charles, Camilla and William proceed behind the Imperial State Crown
    (

    Image:
    REUTERS)

    It was the first time that Charles read the speech
    (

    Image:
    POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

    Love the royals? Sign up for the Mirror's daily newsletter to get all the latest news on the Queen, Charles, Kate, Wills, Meghan, Harry and the rest of The Firm. Click here to sign up .

    The Regalia – the Imperial State Crown, the Cap of Maintenance and Sword of State – travelled in their own carriage, ahead of the royals, escorted by senior members of the royal household.

    The decision was taken on Monday, and the Queen’s mobility issues are said to be a continuation of the problems she has suffered since the autumn.

    Charles wore a navy uniform for the event
    (

    Image:
    Getty Images)

    Camilla arrived alongside Prince Charles
    (

    Image:
    Getty Images)

    A new Letters Patent authorised by the Queen was issued to cover the State Opening delegating to Counsellors of State the royal function of opening a new session of Parliament.

    In this instance, it enables Charles and William to jointly exercise that function. No other functions have been delegated by the Queen.

    Buckingham Palace said in a statement: “The Queen continues to experience episodic mobility problems, and in consultation with her doctors has reluctantly decided that she will not attend the State Opening of Parliament tomorrow.

    Prince William arriving for the State Opening of Parliament
    (

    Image:
    Getty Images)

    “At Her Majesty’s request, and with the agreement of the relevant authorities, The Prince of Wales will read The Queen’s Speech on Her Majesty’s behalf, with The Duke of Cambridge also in attendance.”

    The Queen last missed a state opening of parliament in 1959 and 1963, when she was pregnant with Prince Andrew and then Prince Edward, when her speech was read by the Lord Chancellor.

    The Queen’s Speech is written by the Government and sets out its agenda for Parliament’s new session.

    Read More

    Read More

    Sourse: mirror.co.uk

    Related posts

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    We use cookies in order to give you the best possible experience on our website. By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. You can find a detailed description in our Privacy Policy.
    Accept
    Reject
    Privacy Policy